Agro-colonialism in the Congo: Europe and US Bankroll Land Grab in DRC

| 06.02.2015

(Français ci-dessous)

Réseau d’information et d’appui aux ONG nationales (RIAO-RDC) | GRAIN

Media release
2 June 2015

Agro-colonialism in the Congo: European and US development finance bankrolls a new round of agro-colonialism in the DRC

Download this press release

Several prominent development finance institutions (DFIs) are funding Feronia Inc., a Canadian agribusiness company accused of land grabbing and human rights abuses in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

Stay in the loop with Food First!

Get our independent analysis, research, and other publications you care about to your inbox for free!

Sign up today!

Community leaders living within the 100,000 hectares covered by Feronia Inc.’s oil palm concession areas say the land was taken from them illegally and that they never gave their consent for Feronia to operate there. Feronia is violating DFI policies that prevent companies they invest in from operating on lands that were acquired without the free, prior and informed consent of local communities.

Feronia Inc. operates plantations and a large-scale cereal farm on 120,000 ha of land concessions in the DRC. Its oil palm concessions were acquired from the transnational food company Unilever in 2009.

The company is over 80 percent owned by the UK’s CDC Group and a number of other DFIs—including the French Agency for Development (AFD) and the US government’s Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC)—through their investments in the Mauritius-based African Agriculture Fund (AAF).

DFIs have a mandate to support poverty alleviation in developing countries and must operate according to strict policies that prevent them from investing in companies that grab land, violate labour rights or engage in corrupt practices. A new report, based on company records and testimonies from affected communities, shows how Feronia Inc. is in flagrant violation of the policies of its DFI owners.

“We demand, first and foremost, the start of negotiations to reclaim our rights over the lands that have been illegally taken from us,” reads a statement delivered to RIAO-RDC and the international organisation GRAIN on March 8, 2015 by over 60 customary chiefs and other community leaders from across the district of Yahuma, where 90 percent of Feronia’s Lokutu oil palm plantations are located.

Community leaders interviewed by RIAO-RDC and GRAIN at Lokutu also spoke of a brutal system of labour exploitation and community harassment that clearly violates the DFI policies on labour rights and national labour laws.

To receive a day’s pay, workers on Feronia’s Lokutu plantations say they must complete tasks that are impossible to complete in a day’s work. While the company’s directors are handsomely compensated, plantation and nursery workers say that by the end of the month they have earned around $1.50 per day, well below the DRC’s already low minimum wage.

“We calculated that in 2010, Feronia’s top directors were paid 1,000 times the average annual pay of the company’s plantation workers,” says Ange David Baimey of GRAIN.

One of the Feronia directors who profited most from the company is Barnabe Kikaya bin Karubi, the DRC’s Ambassador to the UK since August 2008 and, prior to that, President Joseph Kabila’s Private Secretary and Minister of Information.

Investigations by GRAIN and RIAO-RDC into Feronia’s company records show that Kikaya was paid a total of nearly $3 million in cash and shares during his time as director with the company from 2009-2014. Most of the money was paid through “rental fees” of between $120,000-$150,000 per year for his residence in Kinshasa and through a buyout of his stake in Feronia’s Cayman Islands holding company. The anti-corruption policies of Feronia’s DFI owners are supposed to prevent such payments to influential politicians.

Community leaders from Lokutu also told GRAIN and RIAO-RDC that Feronia prevents local people from raising livestock or farming within the company’s concession, even on lands that the company has abandoned. Community members caught by company guards carrying just a few nuts fallen from the oil palms are fined or, in many cases, whipped, hand cuffed and taken to the nearest prison.

“Community leaders from the areas where Feronia has its plantations have had enough of this company,” says Jean-François Mombia Atuku of RIAO-RDC. “They want Feronia to give them back the lands, so that they can once again benefit from the use of their forests and farms.”

”The CDC and the other DFIs that own Feronia need to do the right thing: give the people of the DRC back their lands and compensate them for the years of suffering they have endured,” says Graciela Romero Vasquez of the London-based organisation War on Want.

The report, Agro-colonialism in the Congo: European and US development finance bankrolls a new round of colonialism in the DRC, is authored by GRAIN and RIAO-RDC in collaboration with Fundación Mundubat, War on Want, Association Française d’Amitié et de Solidarité avec les Peuples d’Afrique, World Rainforest Movement, Food First, SOS Faim and CIDSE.

Contacts:

Jean-François Mombia
Réseau d’information et d’appui aux ONG nationales (RIAO-RDC)
Dakar, Sénégal
+221-773-469-621
jfma2013@gmail.com

Devlin Kuyek
GRAIN
Montreal, Canada
+1-514-571-7702
devlin@grain.org

Ange David Baimey
GRAIN Accra, Ghana
+233 269089432
ange@grain.org

For questions on the role of the CDC:

Graciela Romero Vasquez
War on Want
London, UK
+44 (0) 20 7324 5066
gromero@waronwant.org

For questions on the role of the AFD/Proparco:

Jean-Claude Rabeherifara
Association Française d’Amitié et de Solidarité avec les Peuples d’Afrique
Paris, France
tel: +33 6 86 62 68 60
jc.rabeh@gmail.com

For questions on the role of the Spanish Agency for International Development Cooperation (AECID):

Fernando Fernandez
Fundación Mundubat
+34 630448838
ffernandez@mundubat.org

For questions on the role of OPIC:

Tanya Kerssen
Food First
Oakland, US
cell: (+591) 6702-6706
tkerssen@foodfirst.org

* DFI investors in the African Agricultural Fund include:
-Agence française de développement (AFD)/Proparco (FISEA), $30M + $10M = $40M
-Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC), $100M
-Spanish Agency for International Development Cooperation (AECID) $40M
-African Development Bank (AfDB), $40M
-European Commission (EC), $12M*
-Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) (amount not known)
-West African Development Bank (BOAD)(amount not known)
-ECOWAS Bank of Investment and Development (EBID) (amount not known)

The full report is available for free download by visiting: http://foodfirst.org/publication/agro-colonialism-in-the-congo/ The report is also available, along with all of GRAIN’s reports, here: http://www.grain.org/article/categories/14-reports

Download this press release

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Réseau d’information et d’appui aux ONG nationales (RIAO-RDC) | GRAIN

Communiqué de presse
2 juin 2015

Agro-colonialisme au Congo : la finance de développement européenne et américaine alimente une nouvelle phase de colonialisme en RDC

Téléchargez le communiqué de presse

Plusieurs grandes institutions financières de développement (IFD) financent actuellement Feronia Inc., une société agroalimentaire canadienne accusée d’accaparement des terres et de violations des droits humains en République démocratique du Congo (RDC).

Les leaders des communautés vivant sur les terres occupées – sur plus de 100 000 ha – par les concessions de palmiers à huile de Feronia Inc à Lokutu et Boteka affirment que les terres leurs ont été enlevées de façon illégale et qu’elles n’ont jamais donné leur consentement à l’installation de Feronia. Feronia viole les principes des IFD qui interdisent aux entreprises dans lesquelles elles investissent d’exploiter des terres acquises sans le consentement libre, préalable, et informé des communautés locales.

Feronia Inc. exploite des plantations et une grande ferme céréalière couvrant 120 000 hectares de concessions foncières en RDC. Ses concessions pour les palmiers à huile ont été rachetées à l’entreprise alimentaire transnationale Unilever en 2009.

Feronia Inc. appartient pour plus de 80 pour cent au CDC Group du gouvernement britannique et plusieurs autres IFD – notamment l’Agence française pour le développement (AFD) et l’agence de développement du gouvernement américain (l’OPIC) – par le biais de leurs investissements dans le Fonds africain pour l’agriculture (AAF) basé à Maurice.

Les IFD sont mandatées pour soutenir l’atténuation de la pauvreté dans les pays en développement et doivent opérer en respectant des principes stricts qui les empêchent d’investir dans des entreprises qui accaparent les terres, violent le droit du travail ou se livrent à des pratiques corrompues. Un nouveau rapport, fondé sur les registres des entreprises et les témoignages des communautés concernées, montre que Feronia Inc. viole de façon flagrante les principes de ses propriétaires IFD.

« Avant tout, nous réclamons le début de négociations pour récupérer nos droits sur les terres qui nous ont été enlevées de façon illégale, » peut-on lire dans une déclaration remise au RIAO-RDC et à l’organisation internationale GRAIN le 8 mars 2015, par plus de 60 chefs coutumiers du district de Yahuma, où se situent 90 pour cent de la plantation de palmiers à huile de Feronia à Lokutu.

Les chefs communautaires interrogés par le RIAO-RDC et GRAIN à Lokutu ont également parlé d’un régime brutal d’exploitation des travailleurs et de harcèlement envers les communautés qui enfreignent clairement les principes des IFD relatifs au droit du travail et la législation nationale sur le travail.

Pour recevoir la paie d’une journée de travail, les ouvriers des plantations de Feronia à Lokutu doivent, disent-ils, accomplir des tâches qu’il est impossible d’accomplir en une seule journée. Alors que les administrateurs de l’entreprise sont grassement payés, les ouvriers des plantations et des pépinières disent qu’à la fin du mois, ils ont gagné 1,50 dollar par jour, ce qui est nettement inférieur au salaire minimal congolais, déjà très bas.

« Nous avons calculé qu’en 2010, les principaux directeurs de Feronia avaient gagné mille fois le salaire annuel moyen des ouvriers de leur plantation, » indique Ange-David Baimey de GRAIN.

L’un des administrateurs de Feronia à avoir le plus largement profité de l’entreprise est Barnabé Kikaya bin Karubi, ambassadeur de la RDC au Royaume-Uni depuis août 2008 et précédemment secrétaire privé et ministre de l’Information du Président Joseph Kabila.

Des recherches menées par GRAIN et le RIAO-RDC dans les registres de Feronia révèlent que Kikaya a reçu près de 3 millions de dollars en liquide et en actions pendant qu’il était directeur de 2009 à 2014. La plus grande partie de l’argent lui a été versée sous la forme de “frais de loyer”  d’un montant de 120 à 150 000 dollars par an pour son domicile de Kinshasa et par le biais du rachat de sa participation à la holding de Feronia aux Iles Caïman. La politique anti-corruption des propriétaires IFD de Feronia est censée prévenir ce genre de versements aux hommes politiques influents.

Les chefs de la communauté de Lokutu ont également rapporté à GRAIN et au RIAO-RDC que Feronia empêche les populations locales d’élever des animaux ou de faire des cultures au sein de la concession allouée à l’entreprise, même sur les terres abandonnées. Les personnes prises par les gardes de Feronia à ramasser ne serait-ce que quelques noix tombées des palmiers sont punies d’une amende ou, très souvent, fouettées, menottées et emmenées à la prison la plus proche.

« Les chefs communautaires des zones où Feronia  exploite ses plantations en ont assez de cette entreprise, » déclare Jean-François Mombia Atuku du RIAO-RDC. « Ils veulent que Feronia leur rende leurs terres, de façon à pouvoir à nouveau profiter de leurs forêts et de leurs fermes. »

« Le CDC et les autres IFD auxquelles appartient Feronia doivent faire ce qui est juste : rendre leurs terres aux populations de la RDC et leur donner une compensation pour les années de souffrance qu’elles ont endurées, » insiste Graciela Romero Vasquez de l’organisation londonienne War on Want.

Le rapport  Agro-colonialisme au Congo : la finance de développement européenne et américaine alimente une nouvelle phase de colonialisme en RDC a été écrit par GRAIN et le RIAO-RDC, en collaboration avec la Fundación Mundubat, War on Want, l’Association Française d’Amitié et de Solidarité avec les Peuples d’Afrique, World Rainforest Movement, FoodFirst, SOS Faim et la CIDSE.

Contacts presse:

Jean-François Mombia
Réseau d’information et d’appui aux ONG nationales (RIAO-RDC)
Dakar, Sénégal
+221-773-469-621
jfma2013@gmail.com

Devlin Kuyek
GRAIN
Montréal, Canada
+1-514-571-7702
devlin@grain.org

Ange David Baimey
GRAIN
Accra, Ghana
+233 269089432
ange@grain.org

Pour les questions sur le rôle du CDC:

Graciela Romero Vasquez
War on Want
Londres, Royaume Uni
+44 (0) 20 7324 5066
gromero@waronwant.org

Pour les questions sur le rôle de l’AFD/PROPARCO :

Jean-Claude Rabeherifara
Association Française d’Amitié et de Solidarité avec les Peuples d’Afrique
Paris, France
tel: +33 6 86 62 68 60
jc.rabeh@gmail.com

Pour les questions sur le rôle de l’Agence espagnole de Coopération internationale pour le développement (AECID):

Fernando Fernandez
Fundación Mundubat
+34 630448838
ffernandez@mundubat.org

Pour les questions sur le rôle de l’OPIC :

Tanya Kerssen
Food First
Oakland, États-Unis
Oakland, US
+591 6702-6706
tkerssen@foodfirst.org

* Investisseurs des IFD dans le Fonds africain pour l’agriculture :
– Agence française de développement (AFD)/PROPARCO (FISEA), $30M + $10M = $40M (2011)
– Société des investissements privés à l’étranger (OPIC), $100M (2011)
– Agence espagnole pour la coopération internationale au développement (AECID) $40M (2010)
– Banque africaine de développement (AfDB), $40M
– Commission européenne (CE) $12M
– Banque de développement d’Afrique du Sud (DBSA) montant inconnu
– Banque ouest-africaine de développement (BOAD)  montant inconnu
– Banque d’investissement et de développement de la CEDEAO (BIDC) montant inconnu

Le rapport complet est disponible en visitant: http://foodfirst.org/publication/agro-colonialism-in-the-congo/ et http://www.grain.org/article/categories/14-reports

Téléchargez le communiqué de presse